Tuesday, 7 April 2009

ABC Wednesday - L

L is for Lighthouse

To start with the youngest of our trio above is the Tynemouth lighthouse and pier built in 1903. The ferries pass here on their way to Scandinavia and continental Europe. Tynemouth is a historic town and resort at the mouth of the River Tyne. The pier is closed in stormy weather

Next comes the Chanory Point lighthouse (the white building in the distance built in 1846) on the Black Isle in Scotland. This is on a narrow spit on the Morray Firth where the tide sluices through the narrows. The point is a popular place for dolphin watchers and the colony of bottle-nose dolphins are the most northerly in Europe. It is also a good spot to watch porpoises and seals.

Now you may think that lighthouses mark dangerous places and hazards but here is one (just to the left of the cherry trees) that is well inland and has never flashed a light although it is lit up at night with spotlights.
This is the Sir John Barrow monument built in 1850 to commemorate Ulverston's famous son who was the 2nd secretary to the Admiralty. It is based on the John Smeaton designed Eddystone Lighthouse of 1759.
The hill is called Hoad (436 ft) so it is generally known as the Hoad Monument or the 'pepper pot'. The monument is 100 foot high and there are is a 112 step spiral staircase inside leading to magnificent views at the top to the sea and mountains.
Unfortunately it is no longer open as it is in need of repair (see the cracks below) however money is being raised to bring it back to its original state.
Hoad Hill is a popular walk but it will be busy this Easter week-end because this is where the children will be rolling their Pasch Eggs on Easter Monday. These are eggs hard boiled with onions skins and various other things to colour them although sometimes today they are painted. The aim is to roll yours the furthest without cracking it. The dialect word is Pace Eggs which is which is derived from Pasch meaning easter or passover and is supposed to symbolise the stone being rolled from Jesus's tomb although it may come from an earlier Celtic tradition.

There is an old Lancashire superstition that the empty pace eggs must be crushed because they can be used by witches as boats! Well it must be boring always being on broomsticks.

For Lots more Ls go to Mrs Nesbitts ABC Wednesday

10 comments:

gone to the dogs said...

I love lighthouses. These are real beauties.

Sylvia K said...

I love lighthouses, too, and your post is really interesting. Always enjoy learning things I didn't know before. Thanks and Happy Easter!

photowannabe said...

Very interesting lighthouses and funny last part about the witches getting tired of riding on their broomsticks.

Celeste said...

Lighthouses are so cool. I used to live in Cornwall, we have a profusion of them there. They are very evocitive structures.

Carol said...

Great shots...I love lighthouses also. Interesting info and a great L.

Tumblewords: said...

Lovely lighthouses and interesting narrative. Thank you!

Commonweeder said...

I loved the tour! We have lived near lighthouses, but right now we are in the mountains.

Jay said...

So why don't the witches use boats? LOL!

Lighthouses are somehow romantic, aren't they? Nice pictures!

Miss_Yves said...

Perfect choice, and lovely photos ...
I enjoy Virginia Woolf's novel ,"To the lighthouse".

Your EG Tour Guide said...

Lighthouse seems like the perfect L for someone who lives on an island. ;-) I'm fascinated by them...and I live inland. I'm hoping to convince my husband to visit a few on Lake Ontario and Lake Huron this summer. Wish me luck. ;-)