Tuesday, 13 August 2013

Aye Eye

I thought I would rest the London Eye on the Shell Building for this photograph and handily for an ABC Wednesday letter E its branding at the moment is the EDF Energy London Eye.  135 metres high its 30 minute whirl  is a popular destination.  The Shell Building is clad in Portland Stone which has meant that it has weathered better than other high rises built in 1961. London's new year countdown is projected onto the tower.   While taking this photograph I was stood on the Victoria Embankment
where an eagle flies.  Perhaps it may soar away north to York where
 the Euston railway station gates have made the journey.  Here at the National Railway Museum it is a popular resting area, maybe the essence of railway entrances lingers as a meeting place.  I wondered where they were on the original station and found this photograph from the 1950s
and they can be glimpsed by the columns. Euston was the world's first capital terminal and to mark the opening in 1837 this 70 feet high entrance was constructed of Portland Stone as a scaled up replica of a Doric Portico such as might have been seen in ancient Greece, but on a colossal scale.  Demolished in the 1960s when a lot of Victorian London was lost it was replaced by what has been described as "mundane modernism" and the dark uninviting station it is today. The Victorians also built outside the station four small lodges in matching Portland Stone for parcel collection and two of them survive but cast adrift with no purpose
I had no idea of their original use and took this photo only because of the interesting list of northern towns, one of which I sometimes change at to take the train down to London. Now knowing the original purpose I realise these are the names of the towns served by the railway.  The only other reminder of the old stations is

the reimagining of the Doric Arch on Euston's pub sign.  

An entry to ABC Wednesday - a journey through the alphabet




11 comments:

photowannabe said...

I appreciate learning all the interesting history.
Great photos if EYE do say so myself.

Roger Owen Green said...

I was pretty much unaware of it until the London Olympics!
ROG, ABC Wednesday team

MERYL JAFFE, PhD - parent, psychologist, teacher, author... said...

Great play on words and great post. Thomas the Tank Engine just made me smile!

Leslie: said...

On my "bucket list" is to go up in the London Eye. We were going to go last summer, but Lorne got sick and ended up in hospital. So we had to head home before he was completely well enough to go on it. But next time........

Leslie
abcw team

Reader Wil said...

Interesting to read this about the train stations. I like the London Eye because it is made in Holland at a factory in the neighbourhood. My daughter has drawn a small part of it when she worked as a draughtswoman there at the factory. The cabins were made in France. I would love to have a ride in one of them on a clear and sunny day.
Have a great day.
Wil,ABCW Team.

Lea said...

Lots of E words there, and an interesting bit of history
Happy Wednesday!
Lea
Lea's Menagerie

Jama said...

Here it's called the Flyer, instead of the eyes...

Pheno Menon said...

Excellent Entry for E

PhenoMenon, ABCW Team

Hazel Ceej said...

Ah... I'm just reminded how tour time ran out for me when I was in London. Next time I visit the lovely city perhaps.

Nanka said...

Imposing structures which have stood the test of time!! They really knew how to construct in that era!! Reminds me of some of the structures here which so resembles these!!


"My Post Is Here"

mrsnesbitt said...

The Railway Museum - a particular favourite here.